Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Hate Crime’ Category

IB imageSnapshots of law, gender and sexuality news from the past couple of weeks.

The LGBTQ+ Community and “Gay Conversion Therapy”

William Lee, University of Manchester

Malta made history on the 7th December 2016 when the Maltese Parliament unanimously approved the Affirmation of Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Gender Expression Bill. Among other things, the Bill criminalises “gay conversion therapy”, giving legal recognition that for the position that “no sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression constitutes a disorder, disease or shortcoming of any sort”. This thereby relieves the LGBTQ+ community of potentially being subjugated to any “deceptive and harmful” act designed to change their sexual behaviour or gender identity.

The new Act in effect positions Malta as the first European country to ban “gay conversion therapy”.

The Business Insider states that Malta has been at the forefront of progressive social reforms in Europe since the Labour government was elected in 2013. For that, Malta quite comfortably deserves its ranking of being the best European country for LGBTQ+ rights as deemed by the European Region of the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association (ILGA- Europe).

In light of such radical progress in Malta, this post will look briefly at the origins of “gay conversion therapy”. It will also briefly outline the United Kingdom (UK) and American’s current stance in regard to this practice. (more…)

Read Full Post »

IB image

Twitter Clamps down on Abuse and Hate Crime

Ama Williams, Newcastle University

Online abuse on social media platforms is endemic. The majority of people who frequent social media will have either seen or been the victim of some form of abuse. Last week Twitter introduced provisions to try and tackle online abuse and instances of hate crime – that is, abuse targeted toward someone because of their membership of a particular social group. It has now added ‘Advanced Muting Options’ to the previous option to mute accounts. This means that a user can block certain words or phrases from appearing in their personal notifications, in the hope that this will shield the user from abuse being targeted specifically at them. However there is some concern that these measures do not actually stop hate speech being posted and due to the anonymity Twitter affords to its users, abuse may continue to be prolific.

Recent reports have shown that abuse online is on the increase. Pink News reported that there has been an online spike of homophobia since Donald Trump’s victory in the presidential race. In one instance a homophobic word increased from being tweeted 8,000 times to 32,000 times in the day after his win. In England, abuse of women in positions of power is inherent on many platforms but social media seems to breed particularly depraved forms of hatred. (more…)

Read Full Post »

YRYvette Russell is a Lecturer in Law at the University of Bristol. 

On July 13, 2016 Nottinghamshire police became the first force in the UK to recognise misogyny as a hate crime.  Hate crime is defined as ‘any criminal offence which is perceived, by the victim or any other person, to be motivated by hostility or prejudice based on a personal characteristic’. In practical terms, this means that in Nottinghamshire police can record reported incidents such as wolf whistling, verbal abuse, taking photographs without consent, and using mobile phones to send unwanted messages with an additional ‘flag’ or qualifier on their incident log as hate crime.  It appears that the move is largely symbolic, as gender animus is not a relevant aggravating factor for the purposes of sentencing under relevant UK ‘hate crime’ legislation,[1] and does not create any new criminal offences.  However, the initiative has been supported by the force working in partnership with the Nottingham Women’s Centre and has involved the specialised training of officers to better identify and respond to the public harassment of women by men. (more…)

Read Full Post »

IB imageSnapshots of law, gender and sexuality news from the past couple of weeks

The First Discussions About Intersex Issues at the United Nations Human Rights Council

Gita Keshava, Durham University

This week has marked a development in the protection of intersex people at the level of the United Nations. On Monday, March 10 2014, Holly Greenberry, an intersex activist with IntersexUK, addressed the UN Human Rights Council on behalf of intersex organisations around the world about current human rights issues. She spoke of the human rights violations faced by intersex children in all countries in the world and the consequences experienced during adulthood. She addressed the issues of discrimination at all levels of society, the influence of the media in the stigmatization of intersex people, and the violence that is perpetrated against them. On Tuesday, March 11 2014, activists from the United Kingdom, Argentina, Switzerland, and Australia discussed genital mutilation, psychological trauma, discrimination, and torture faced by intersex people and called for concrete action to be taken by the international community. It marks the first – and hopefully not the last – time that the United Nations has held an event targeting the specific human rights violations currently faced by intersex people. (more…)

Read Full Post »

10689909_1016854768344392_8793741729286128967_nProfessor Alex Sharpe, School of Law, Keele University

Until very recently, I used to think transgender people were an especially vulnerable group in our society. It certainly appeared so. Didn’t they experience far more violence, discrimination and general incivility than most of us? In fact, I’m sure I remember reading somewhere (somewhere credible in fact) that 42% of transgender people never come out at work for fear of losing their jobs. Well you can understand it really. Indeed, and sorry for being pedantic, but wasn’t it the case, despite an obvious clear and present danger, that law, and the criminal justice system more generally, failed miserably to protect transgender people’s bodily and sexual autonomy? In fact, I might be mistaken (though I think you’ll find I’m not), but wasn’t it the case that the very definition of rape excluded transgender women so that cisgender men could basically rape them with impunity (see, further, my article ‘The Failure to Degenderise the Law of Rape: The Criminal Justice and Public Order Act and the Transsexual Rape Victim’ (1995) The Criminal Lawyer, 7-8). Of course, some things have improved. But none of this really matters, because this version of recent history (while true) is no longer fashionable.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Hannah Al-Othman read law at Durham as an undergraduate. She now works for Shadow Equalities Minister Kate Green MP, and is studying for an MA in News Journalism. This post was originally posted on Hannah’s Comments.

The 41 new Police and Crime Commissioners have started the job, although for most it remains unclear exactly what they are going to be doing.

For more than a quarter it seems that their first task will be to recruit new Chief Constables after many have stepped down – in some cases because they did not want to serve under a Commissioner. One previous Chief Constable of the Gloucestershire force, Tony Melville, resigned citing “grave concerns” over PCCs, saying he would rather stand aside than be governed by a Commissioner.

As much as the police did not want PCCs, neither did the public. The elections recorded an historically low turnout of less than 15% nationwide, with one polling station in Newport registering an appalling 0% turnout. Many people chose not to vote in the elections because they did not know enough about the role of the Police Commissioners, because they had received no information from any of the political parties, because they did not understand what the election was about, or because they did not agree with the idea of politicising the police.

The turnout was so low that the legitimacy of PCCs is now being called into question by many, and the Electoral Commission is launching an investigation into the process. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Kathryn Hendry (Guest Blogger)

In South Africa, just before Christmas last year, Constitutional Court Judge Edwin Cameron wrote an open letter to the film producer of the movie adaptation of Spud. The official website of the movie can be found here. Spud, penned by John van de Ruit is the first of a series of books that relates the humorous ‘coming of age’ adventures of a young boy at a private all-boys boarding school in South Africa. The book was a great success in South Africa and the film adaptation included John Cleese in the talented cast. The official site of the book can be found here.

Justice Cameron’s open letter can be read here. In his open letter to Ross Garland, Justice Cameron raised his disquiet at the seeming homophobic slurs hinted at in some of the humour of the film production, including the joke of John Cleese’s character about ‘rogering lesbians’. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »